Freedom Leg Brace from Forward Mobility can help in the treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

According to statistics from the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA) website, Diabetes affects 26 million people in the US and more than 366 million people worldwide and up to 25% of those with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer. More than half of all foot ulcers will become infected, requiring hospitalization and 20% of infections result in amputation. This means that every 20 seconds, somewhere in the world, a limb is lost as a consequence of diabetes.

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One of the important elements in the treatment of a Diabetic foot ulcer is to reduce the weight on the foot with the ulcer allowing the tissue to heal. Many people with Diabetes, especially the elderly, are not strong or stable enough to use crutches so they have not had many good options before the Freedom Leg. As mentioned in an early post, “The Freedom Leg in conjunction with a secondary device such as a cane or walker can give them safe mobility. The Freedom Leg can support their weight while the secondary device can provide additional stability.”

 

Using Freedom Leg with Compromised Mobility

An important patient group for the Freedom Leg are those with compromised mobility. They would be unable to use crutches and have few alternatives.

The Freedom Leg in conjunction with a secondary device such as a cane or walker can give them safe mobility. The Freedom Leg can support their weight while the secondary device can provide additional stability.

One of the largest groups that fall in this category are those with Diabetic Foot Ulcers. The most important ingredient to getting the ulcer to heal is to keep the weight of it. Many people with Diabetes, especially the elderly, are not strong or stable enough to use crutches so they have not had many good options before the Freedom Leg. This has resulted in thousands of amputations each year.

The Freedom Leg is now showing great success is giving them the mobility aid that was needed to consistently off-load the foot and allowing it to heal.